Monitor Kubernetes in Production with Automated Dashboards

by Jameson Haas on April 7, 2020

With the recent release of automated dashboards with BindPlane for Google Cloud Monitoring, it is now easier than ever to fully monitor Kubernetes in production. To ensure everything is functioning as it should, you need to make sure your containers, clusters, pods and nodes are working in tandem. With all of the moving parts, monitoring the health and performance of your Kubernetes environment can be troublesome. To help, BindPlane makes it easy to monitor everything in a centralized location with, easy to use one-click automated dashboards.

Once BindPlane is configured for your environment, you’re just one click away from 27 production critical dashboards, including 5 individual dashboards to monitor Kubernetes in production.

monitoring kubernetes in production

Monitor Kubernetes in Production with Dashboards

After a one-click, automated install, you will unlock the following dashboards directly in your Google Cloud Monitoring project.

  • Kubernetes Cluster
    • Kubernetes Cluster Widgets:
      • Average CPU Usage
      • Failed Pod Count
      • Total Memory Usage
      • Total Received Data
  • Kubernetes Namespace Overview
    • Kubernetes Namespace Overview Widgets:
      • Average CPU Usage
      • Failed Pod Count
      • Total Memory Usage
Kubernetes Namespace Overview dashboard, dashboard, monitor Kubernetes in production
  • Kubernetes Pod Overview
    • Kubernetes Pod Overview Widgets:
      • CPU Limit Usage
      • CPU Request Usage
      • CPU Usage
      • Memory Limit Usage
      • Memory Request Usage
      • Memory Usage
      • Restart Count
      • Used Ephemeral Space
      • Used Ephemeral Space Ratio
Kubernetes Pod Overview, dashboard, monitor Kubernetes in production
  • Kubernetes Container Overview
    • Kubernetes Container Overview Widgets:
      • CPU Limit Usage
      • CPU Request Usage
      • CPU Usage
      • Memory Limit Usage
      • Memory Request Usage
      • Memory Usage
      • Ready
      • Restart Count
      • Used Space
      • Used Space Ratio
Kubernetes container overview dashboard, dashboard, monitor Kubernetes in production
  • Kubernetes Node Overview
    • Kubernetes Node Overview Widgets:
      • CPU Usage
      • CPU Usage Ratio
      • Memory Usage
      • Memory Usage Ratio
      • Pod Count
      • Received Data
      • Used Space
      • Used Space Ratio
Kubernetes node overview dashboard, dashboard, monitor Kubernetes in production

After choosing which dashboard you would like to view within Google Cloud Monitoring, you will have full access to edit them.

monitoring kubernetes in production dashboards

Get started with BindPlane for Google Cloud Monitoring to gain access to these automated dashboards to fully monitor Kubernetes in production.

Google Cloud Monitoring Dashboards Automated

by Nate Coppinger on April 1, 2020

Have you heard the good news? We’re excited to announce that you can have Google Cloud Monitoring Dashboards Automated with BindPlane! With a single click of a button in BindPlane, you can have a dashboard automatically created for your favorite supported sources directly in Google Cloud Monitoring. In this blog, we’ll walk you through the simple process of automating the creation of your dashboards. You can also watch our video walkthrough. 

It’s very simple to get started with your Google Cloud Monitoring dashboards. The first step is to open up and log into BindPlane. 

BindPlane UI, Google Cloud Monitoring Dashboards Automated, Automation, Dashboards

Next select ‘Destination’ under the metrics section. 

Destination, Google Cloud Monitoring Dashboards Automated, Automation, Dashboards

Now it will take you to a page that presents you with all of your available destinations. Here you will click Google Cloud Monitoring. Click the destination that would like to have your dashboard created in.

Dashboard selection, Google Cloud Monitoring Dashboards Automated, Automation, Dashboards

Scroll down to the source that you want BindPlane to auto-generate a dashboard for, directly in Google Cloud Monitoring.

Google Cloud Monitoring Dashboards Automated, Automation, Dashboards

Click Install on your desired sources, and you’re all done! The dashboard has been created in Google Cloud Monitoring and now all that is left is to take a look at your shiny new dashboard.

Head over to Google Cloud Monitoring and enter the source you’re looking for into the filter bar. From here you can select one of the Google Cloud Monitoring dashboards automated by BindPlane. Most sources will have a single dashboard created, but some, like Kubernetes will have multiple dashboards available.

After you have selected the dashboard you wish to view, you can now see which metrics are included in the dashboard, and you can edit them to your liking. 

We hope you enjoy these Google Cloud Monitoring dashboards automated with Bindplane as much as we do. For more information, visit our site to learn about BindPlane and it integrates into Google Cloud Monitoring and Google Cloud Logging to bring you a great monitoring experience.

Elasticsearch Query Performance | Metrics to Watch

by Nate Coppinger on March 26, 2020

If you’re using the Elasticsearch query functionality, for mainly front-facing client search, there are 3 important metrics to monitor performance.

Elasticsearch Query Load

Your cluster can be putting up with any number of queries at a time. The volume of queries over time will align roughly to the load of requests laying a potential burden. Unexpected peaks and valley in a time series of query load could be signs of a problem or potential optimization opportunities.

Elasticsearch Query Latency

The average query latency, measured as the total count of queries and the total time over regular intervals, will alert you to how your available resources are performing under your set conditions. Establish a ceiling where if query latency breaches a particular max, there could be resource strain or opportunity for optimization.

Elasticsearch Fetch Latency

As the second part of Elasticsearch’s search process, fetch follows the query step to deliver the requested data. Fetch latency should be considerably lower than your query latency. Normal behavior would be indicated by level constant fetch latency. Should fetch latency begin to rise, there’s likely issues developing within your resources.

Full Elasticsearch monitoring

A full list of metrics and log data that BindPlane will collect from your Elasticsearch instance can be found in our Elasticsearch docs.

Elasticsearch, bindplane, gcp monitoring, metrics, Elasticsearch Query Performance, Metrics to Watch

Elasticsearch Node Performance | Metrics to Watch

by Nate Coppinger on March 24, 2020

The machine that runs your instance of Elasticsearch will indicate vital signs of performance. Eyes on the CPU, memory usage, and disk I/O will ensure optimal Elasticsearch node performance in production.

Elasticsearch node | CPU Performance

You may notice that your Elasticsearch instance can easily eat up CPU. CPU peaks are expected but underlying issues could be lurking. Whether it is clear performance issues or not, there will certainly be an opportunity for performance optimization. The Java Virtual Machine (JVM) indicators will likely coincide with the spikes in CPU you see in your Elasticsearch node performance. Match the spikes in JVM metrics with Elasticsearch node performance CPU to uncover the underlying cause.

JVM metrics, elasticserarch metics, cpu utilization, dashboard, Elasticsearch node performance Metrics to watch

Elasticsearch node | memory usage

It is particularly normal to expect no free memory on the machine running your Elasticsearch instance. This is not an indicator to panic because you want your machine to be utilizing all of the available memory. However, the cached memory availability is something to keep your eye on. If you see the cached memory is running low, then you can expect available RAM to be running low.

Elasticsearch memory used, dashboard, Elasticsearch node performance Metrics to watch

Elasticsearch node | disk I/O rate

When Elasticsearch is deployed as a search engine it is expected that disk I/O will be put to the test. When a reduction in disk I/O is materializing in the machine, underlying problems are present. Let this be a catalyst to troubleshoot what the culprit issue may be.

data i/0, dashboard, Elasticsearch node performance Metrics to watch

The ratio between read and write operations will vary based on the particular usage of Elasticsearch you have deployed. Depending on the ratio within the node, indexing and query performance could be sources of optimization.

Google Operations is Here! But Where’s Stackdriver?

by Craig Lee on March 9, 2020

Last week, Google Cloud Platform (GCP) announced that it rebranded its Stackdriver monitoring and logging platform that Google acquired in 2014, to be part of its new Google Operations platform. This rebrand included renaming Google Stackdriver Monitoring to Google Cloud Monitoring and Google Stackdriver Logs to Google Cloud Logging. So what does this mean for Stackdriver customers?

While I for one am excited to see Google pulling all of its operations products together, I also want to be clear that other than a few new feature releases, these products are in fact still Stackdriver! We are looking at this rebrand as essentially being Google Stackdriver 2.0. It allows Google to say goodbye to the Stackdriver brand as it fully embraces its Google-Esque naming conventions to make it clear what Stackdriver delivers. The new Google Cloud Operations SKU enables Google to take the monitoring and logging functionality that Stackdriver customers know and love and promote it to the”Googleverse so that other GCP customers can also benefit. 

This changing direction can be seen in the recent merging of the Stackdriver Metrics UI into the Google Cloud Console. A change that will make for a more unified experience in the Google Ecosystem. 

Google Cloud Platform

Google Monitoring is now available in the same console as all the other services.

BindPlane Logs and metrics will continue to integrate with Google Cloud Logging and Google Cloud Monitoring to support the extension of Google Cloud’s monitoring capabilities to on-prem, hybrid cloud and multi-cloud environments. This allows for GCP users to manage over 150+ of the most common non-GCP technology sources all within Google Cloud, enhancing the observability for users all within Google Cloud. One of the most exciting parts about this new release is that Google did add in a few feature updates that BindPlane customers have been asking for! Some of these features include:

  • Dashboard API to create and share dashboards across projects
  • Log storage for up to 10 years
  • Metrics retention for up to 24 months
  • Increased granularity of metric write-up to 10 seconds

As Google continues its momentum with Google Cloud Operations, one thing is for sure – whether we call it Stackdriver or Google Cloud Logging and Monitoring, BindPlane will continue to help GCP customers extend their visibility to on-prem and hybrid clouds to accurately troubleshoot, monitor and report, and real-time alert on their full-stack all within GCP!

Get Started with BindPlane for Google Cloud Logging & Monitoring:

Registering for BindPlane to support Google Cloud Operations is still the same process. You can signup for your BindPlane account here

To learn more about BindPlane, visit Google’s documentation for Google Operations or view BindPlane on the Google Marketplace.


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